Coming on in (drainage) leaps and (electrical) bounds

Last week my brother-in-law (who is a proper builder) and sister came across for a couple of days to tackle the drains and also the studwork for the bathrooms. Drains are relatively simple, but given it is so important to get them right it is very useful to have someone who knows what they are doing to set them out properly. The electrician also came across – so in the space of a day and-a-half the the drains were put in, the flooring was finished, the studwork for the bathrooms (the only internal walls other than straw) was put up and first-fix electrics was done.

It has just remained for me to chase-in the electrical conduits and secure the switch and socket boxes into the straw. The chasing was best done with a claw hammer and the boxes were secured using hazel pins about 30cm long as massive rawl plugs (see picture). These provided a reasonably firm fix – but I wouldn’t use them for fixing anything too large or heavy to the walls. For things like kitchen units I will probably revert to chasing 4×2 uprights into the straw and fixing these to the floor plates and then screwing horizontal batons into these. (Note the picture shows the boxes and conduits as the electrician left them – they are not secured into the straw).

For holding the conduits in place I used some smaller hazel pins and put a bent nail into the end and hammered these into the straw beside the conduit (see picture).

I have also had to prepare one corner for the installation of a pellet boiler. The view from HETAS is that you need a fireproof plasterboard and a 12mm air gap between this and the straw – so to be doubly sure I rendered the corner with one coat of lime, then put a 2×1 frame onto this, screwed top-and-bottom into the ring beams and also secured against the straw using hazel pin rawl plugs and then attached the fireboard. Final job to do here is make a hearth out of quarry tiles and we will then be ready to get the pellet stove in – which will provide heat and be very useful for helping dry out the clay plaster (next big job).

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s